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How to Stop Summer Learning Loss

Don’t let your kids’ learning slide this summer

‘Summer learning loss’ also called ‘summer slide’ or ‘summer slump’ is well-documented. Try ‘googling’ ‘summer learning loss’ and you will see many studies which declare that a 100 per cent of students experience summer learning loss if they do not engage in some sort of educational activity. It takes children at least 4 – 6 weeks to catch up from this loss. According to various academic studies, kids can lose up to 2.6 months worth of their learning each summer if they do not engage in some sort of educational activities. Summer holidays are meant to be a time for care-free fun. Please do not change this attitude – just include games in your itinerary that enrich learning. We are definitely not saying stay inside and study but instead tie in clever ways of learning when you are enjoying the summer sun.

Parent.com has 35 amazing and fun activities – which are definitely worth checking out. It lists treasure hunts to cooking which integrates reading, maths, and following directions etc. 

One of the best – fail-safe ways to beat the regression is to ‘read’. Expose your child to text – listen to them read as well as read to your child. Whatever level your child is at, whether they are learning their sounds or starting chapter books, keep their learning going and make sure that you make it fun! Read every day. Read anything and everything: books, magazines, the newspaper, etc. ‘reading is reading’.

                               

 

How to get your child to buy into the excitment of books.

1. Explore the book in an indepth way. Say the title and ask your child what you think the book is about. 

2. Make turning the first page a ‘big deal’ and get into the role of story telling. 

3. Ask lots of ‘what do you think will happen next’ questions and see if you can find empathy with the characters in the story. Ask your child if they have ever felt like one of the characters…

4. Maybe don’t read the whole book and save it for the next day or if you finish the book ask your child their favourite character, page etc… 

5. A good way to make your child feel responsible is to let the hold the book and turn the pages. 

The long and the short of it is - more exciting you make the reading experience the more beneficial it is for the child giving them the best platform to be able to use books to learn. 

A ‘book at bedtime’ should be an essential part of a child’s bedtime routine. It settles the child before bed and enriches their imagination.

 

Look out for our next blog which will outline lots of fun learning to read activities. In the meantime check out our pinterest boards for 'craft activities', 'books we love' and 'apps we love'.

 

 

 

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